People Aren’t Angry Drunks – People Are Angry – Let’s Start There.

Angry

Why? Why, in this blessed world that we live in are people so angry? Why are people fighting and king hitting others? Why is road rage becoming the norm and seemingly getting more and more violent by the day? People aren’t just angry drunks, people are just plain angry, let’s start the conversation there and tackle this issue at the core.

So often the media will report on incidents that happen over the course of a weekend in various nightspots across the country. More often than not there will be a reference to alcohol or drugs and how this has contributed to the incident and the increase in violence on our streets at night. While this may be true to a degree, are people not angry in the first place and then the substances they ingest are just further fanning the flames of a fire already lit?

No one ever seems to want to attack a problem at the cause these days, in my opinion of course. It seems like the easier and more socially acceptable option to treat the symptoms and be seen to be doing something to address a problem than to actually work towards preventing it from happening again.

To play the cynical card, this does keep a large supply of people in work; social workers, police, psychologists, drug rehabilitation clinics and medical staff; so without treating the symptoms, people would be out of work. BUT, these people were employed long before we starting fanning the flames of a sociological problem that we have essentially created by enabling behaviours, not stopping them.

We like to talk about our feelings these days, we like to pin our issues back to something that we saw when we were two years old that hurt our feelings. We like to feel empowered and tell the world how we’ve turned everything around. But I call bullshit, because I don’t see too many people genuinely owning their issues for the right reasons, more so for a short burst of fame or a viral social media post.

I suppose I can only base these opinions on what I see reported in the media some would say. But actually, I base them heavily on my own experiences from working in welfare for the better part of a decade and seeing system after system implemented and seeing system after system fail. Budgets, and lack of funding are so often where vital support services are let down and I can only draw the conclusion, once again playing the cynic card, that there is no profit measurable by the almighty dollar attached to achieving great outcomes in this sector. We’ve built a system where we need people at all levels to play their role so that those above them can exist, for those above would not exist in their current form without those below.

Getting back to there being a measurable outcome or profit, would it not be measured by the fact that those who have struggled with drugs, alcohol, domestic violence, homelessness and various other issues are able to be rehabilitated and supported back into independent living in society and thus are able to re-educate, re-train and start contributing to the economy again?

Would there not be vast savings in our already bursting at the seams health and welfare sector by not having so many people using it daily? Or does the issue lie in that we’ve built this glorious system as I mentioned before and the reality is, if there is no one below, then there is no need for anyone above so we’d have to go back to the drawing board to put many people on an even playing field. Something, which many people will boast about wanting, but so very few will actually do. Despite this modern day notion of we humans all being one, we still very much operate with a need for one to be better than the other in order to feel validated and a little superior.

So how does this all tie in with the headline? Well its simple. The repetitive theme amongst our ever growing social issues is that the cause of a problem is rarely treated, merely the symptoms managed. And if we start to get it right in just one area of society and continue to do so, then this can only flow on to the next. Sure, it might be a bit uncomfortable and we might have to re-write a few University degrees, but if the pay off is every human having access to basic services, running water and a roof over their heads every night, is that not the ultimate reward?

8 thoughts on “People Aren’t Angry Drunks – People Are Angry – Let’s Start There.

  1. Gail Kaufman Reply

    I’ve noticed it too. There is too much rage out there. It’s unhealthy on an individual and societal level. Anger is a easy prey for unsavory leaders and leads to unspeakable violence. It fosters a litigious society where there is always someone to blame and may lead to suicide when we blame ourselves. It contributes to health disorders and dysfunctional families. Our systems for aid and medical care seem to perpetuate it. If we could address this increasing trend of uncontrollable rage, we could root out the underlying cause of many issues.

    • scanphilosophy Reply

      So where to from here Gail? How do we get our voice heard? Or is it more a call to action? Have we been stuck on thought for too long?

      • Gail Kaufman Reply

        Any cultural shift needs to start with children. Integrate anger management into the school curriculum, educate parents and be good role models ourselves. This type of change begins with awareness and evolves over generations. Writing about it publicly is a start, which we are doing here☺️

  2. Gail Kaufman Reply

    I’ve noticed it too. There is too much rage out there. It’s unhealthy on an individual and societal level. Anger is a easy prey for unsavory leaders and leads to unspeakable violence. It fosters a litigious society where there is always someone to blame and may lead to suicide when we blame ourselves. It contributes to health disorders and dysfunctional families. Our systems for aid and medical care seem to perpetuate it. If we could address this increasing trend of uncontrollable rage, we could root out the underlying cause of many issues.

    • scanphilosophy Reply

      So where to from here Gail? How do we get our voice heard? Or is it more a call to action? Have we been stuck on thought for too long?

      • Gail Kaufman Reply

        Any cultural shift needs to start with children. Integrate anger management into the school curriculum, educate parents and be good role models ourselves. This type of change begins with awareness and evolves over generations. Writing about it publicly is a start, which we are doing here☺️

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